nATASHA mORE

Natasha Vita-More

Innovation, Ethics & Technology Expert, Top 50 Women in Longevity, Member of Scientific
Board of Life Extension Advocacy Foundation, Professor Emeritus: Technology, Ethics & Innovation

Kopia Bez tytułu (24)
Speaking topics

Artificial Intelligence and Humanity
Longevity, Super Longevity, and Evolution
Society, Reform, and the Future

Abstracts

We have been informed about the uncertainties brought about by COVID-19. It has been a wake-up call. The truth is that we have always been vulnerable. In fact, pandemics of the past left red flags warning us of their treacherous veracity. The 2020 series Pandemic: ;How to Prevent an Outbreak documented aspects of the current health issue. But we were forewarned through fictional narratives of Patient Zero (2018),World War Z (2013), Contagion (2011), 28 Days Later (2002), Carriers (2009), and Outbreak (1995) of what could go wrong. Here we are. Now the question is what have we learned from real-world realities outside the narratives of science fiction? This talk addresses the need for a comprehensive strategy for protecting human biology, which is the recipient of viral attacks. Can nanomedicine be our solution? Will genetic engineering mitigate the onslaught and side effects of COVID-19? This is a no-brainer and we all need to investigate, challenge, and agree to a new social order through well-thought-out laws and practices that petition and put in place the sole aim to protect our species.

Artificial intelligence and its convergences with human societies and cultures. Their mutual development has brought about The Internet of Things, Big Data, automation, robotics, blockchain and personalized medicine. This talk gives an overview of the terms and concepts, AI’s history—from the long winter to its resurgences as exponential AI and how society has adapted to smart computers as a way of life. The industry of AI continues to transform our lives with the ability of machines to simulate human-like behaviors and make decisions that mimics human intelligence. AI can help humans at our most basic and essential basic needs: bio-neuros operate at 200 Hz while a microprocessor operates at 2,000,000,000 Hz. But speed is not enough, there is a need for visual perception, speech recognition and decision-making. The immediate need is to organize and assess the continuous and growing flow of Big Data. This growth of Big Data is fueled by the democratization of information and the IoT environment. The ability to leverage information results in a minimum or maximum advantage. We need a maximum leverage and AI and Big Data in three key areas: the economy, personalized medicine, and cybersecurity.

Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Deep Learning (AI, ML, DL) fields have unique practices and interpretations in computer science. Outside this industry, the mainstream is wondering who are building and programing these systems and what is the code of ethics? This talk addresses the vast discontinuity and uncertainty between the industry of computer science and those who are affected by a distinct polarization of ideologies. The core issue is that microprocessors work for machines that gather information about our lives that affects the privacy and security for every person on an extremely intimate level. Humanizing AI requires more than face recognition or emotion recognition. A value alignment model could coordinate human values that shape diverse societies and what people want, not what an AI thinks they need or is told they need by programmers, CEOs, or machine ethicists. This is a serious and tenable issue to have a moral code that is not the construct of a single-minded constituency, even within domain of machine ethics. It is crucial to include both the precautionary principle and the proactionary principle for a balanced assessment of how AI, ML, and DL are used. The fact that AI will have access to all humans and could obtain its own, self-directed future, there are true dangers if AI is not friendly and is used as a tool for ill-will. There is no second-guessing AI. We must get it right.

With the acceleration of computer processing power, artificial intelligence, and big data, the emergent progression of technology is at once explicable and baffling. The rapidity of exponential growth curves has triggered questions about a shifting human paradigm that remain unanswered by theories, philosophies, and religious views. For interpretations sake, understanding the relationship between human and AI requires a shifting of the frame of what it means to be human, nature, and what is natural or normal. An in-depth and discerning approach that explores unexpected challenges of AI technology in relation to what the future human might become is necessary. Further, encompassing diverse perspectives as an amalgamation of multi-disciplinarily fields of science, technology and the humanities is crucial because AI and the human future is not located in any one field or enterprise. Its scope is continually evolving. Do we listen to forecasters who may have a stake in machine-ethics as an academic or business-based benefit, or do we reach our own conclusions based on what humanity needs to survive?

Intelligent computers now understand human needs, desires, and personalized ethics, who we love, and what we fear. This talk addresses the human spirit, human suffering, and a moral justification for overcoming the odds. The potential of a medically effective use of AI to align with human physiology could help mitigate physiological and mental challenges that each person faces. Currently, neuropharmacology alters brain chemistry of through antidepressant drugs, which can be overprescribed. Opioids alleviate the anguish of physical pain but have caused a dependency epidemic. An alternative to these types of therapies for physiological conditions is the study of how to apply smart wearable devices to work with biology through non-invasive medical wearable biofeedback management and pain indicator systems that interface with the central nervous system. These approaches are identified and described, from the current devices in the marketplace and the research and development in labs. It may be true that no technology will eliminate depravity, disease, and uncertainty; however, AI and its human alliances could mitigate human frailties while providing less dependency on pharmacology.  

The purpose of this talk is to prepare you to be skilled at identifying reliable sources for your own a personalized multi-faceted longevity roadmap. You will become acquainted with the entrepreneurs, innovators, scientists, and technologists and their unique breakthroughs. You will be empowered to learn why some research projects fail and how technological advances cause others to excel due to pivots in the industry. While these are key factors to ethical longevity, they are also deeply linked to existential risk, exponential technology, and why ethics matter today more than ever. There are over 3 billion people in the world. By 2050, the world’s population over 60 years will nearly double. The high costs of medical care and concerns about access to healthcare are on the minds of many. What do we do when the facilities are over crowed with an aging population in poor health? In this talk, I will answer these questions and explain how the longevity industry is already working toward resolving these issues with the United Nations, WHO, and government legislation that is making longevity a central topic to governance, legislation, and providing basic human rights.

Two segments of society are crucial for the human species’ sustainability. The newborns who offer hope and the elderly who impart wisdom. These two demographics must be protected and sustained for both anthropological and philosophical reasons. First, they offer new ideas for how humanity can prosper and second, they offer the wisdom of experience. This talk takes a look at these two most precious benefits in our socio-political-economic global currencies. There is a need to keep reproduction thriving and a need to honor and learn from our elderly. According to the UN and its World Population Prospects, while 360,000 babies are born daily, one in six people in the world are currently over 65, outnumbering the children under five years worldwide. The number of people who will be over 80 is projected to triple to approximately 426 million by 2050. Populations are getting older throughout the world. Birthrates are declining. How will we protect these two vulnerable and most precious groups?

Entrepreneurs of longevity are hosting investment pitch sessions to bring in the wealthiest people on the planet. Jim Mellon’s company Juvenescence invested $5 Million in strategic research at AgeX, a subsidiary of BioTime run by gerontologist and pioneer in stem cells, Michael West, MD. But who are the other investors that head up some of the leading tech companies across the planet? Peter Theil, co-founder of PayPal has been investing in longevity sciences for decades, along with Larry Ellison, founder of Oracle, is said to have donated over $400 Million to anti-aging research. The list goes on and the investors are worldwide. This session will introduce some of the leading investors and where they are investing and how that could change the face of how aging is looked at. Bu this is not all. Are any of these large investments being hoodwinked by false promises? Some of the most known investors gave huge sums of money to a company known as Theranos, only to find out that the invention they invested in was never developed. A sum of approximately $600 Million of investors’ money was lost to this scheme.  

Scientists make discoveries, journalists report on them but where is the evidence? In this talk, you will learn about the successes and failures of some of the leading businesses in the life extension industry. You will become skilled at identifying reliable sources and acquainted with the entrepreneurs, innovators, scientists, and technologists and their unique breakthroughs. You will be empowered to learn why some research projects fail and how technological advances cause others to excel due to pivots in the industry. While these are key factors to ethical longevity, they are also deeply linked to existential risk, exponential technology, and why ethics matter today more than ever. There are over 3 billion people in the world. By 2050, the world’s population over 60 years will nearly double. The high costs of medical care and concerns about access to healthcare are on the minds of many. What do we do when the facilities are over crowed with an aging population in poor health? In this talk, I will answer these questions and explain how the longevity industry is already working toward resolving these issues with the United Nations, WHO, and government legislation that is making longevity a central topic to governance, legislation, and providing basic human rights. You will be empowered to learn why some research projects fail and how technological advances cause others to excel due to pivots in the industry. While these are key factors to ethical longevity, they are also deeply linked to existential risk, exponential technology, and why ethics matter today more than ever.  

A playbook is a work-in-progress that forms a procedural manual for your personalized health and longevity. Tis talk gives an overview of the longevity industry and how to navigate your future and what is relevant to how you want to live your life. The Longevity Playbook includes where you are right now and where you want to be in 5, 10, 15 and 20 years. We all have different needs and goals, and you will be coached on how to personalize your longevity. As an example, a 40-year old may have a different set of needs and goals than a 60-year old. A full-time worker differs from a retiree. However, age is secondary to one’s health and well-being. A playbook must be a straightforward and sincere commitment to health goals.. About the Longevity Playbook: The playbook offers a simplified, iterative process that is a repeatable, scalable set of tasks and checklists. These tasks and checklists so that you get the results you aim for. To do this, first we need to have a clear vision of what we want. This is the operations input for your playbook and will determine the output or expected result. To succeed, we start with defining a personalized program, a daily affirmation you send to yourself, and weekly one-on-one with yourself to Dr. Natasha Vita-More / Website / LinkedIn 6 update your playbook. For the playbook, we can use a spreadsheet, a mind-map, or step-by-step template. These can be located on your device or at Google docs for example. You will also calendar daily and weekly reminders from your Longevity Playbook.

Human societies have aspired to live longer since the beginning of time. Afterlife myths and science fiction scenarios flourished extraordinary narratives of cyborg avatars and transhuman uploads. Outside these dramatizations, the aim of super longevity is to extend the maximum human lifespan in good health and well-being far beyond its current time frame through evidence-based science and the ethical use of technology. These protocols require research, development, and testing. There are rules and guidelines that the medical industry must follow. However, there is also an industry worth billions that is investing in cures for aging. Here we have a conundrum. We cannot stop progress and it is far better to provide transparency of opportunity for those who want to use anti-aging therapies over black market tactics. Further, the human right of self-ownership of one’s body and identity brings yet another issue. With advances in artificial intelligence, nanomedicine, genetic engineering along with virtual reality, augmented reality, telepresence, brain-computer interfaces, and building neural networks, the possibilities for Super Longevity can take any number of paths. This talk overs the field of super longevity, the many paths that are being formed, from a practical and informed perspective. This is not science fiction. These paths are being developed and will be travelled.

The human body is a complex organization of parts and systems that generally function together. The brain is the chief executive officer and the heart is the chief operations officer. Its organizational structure runs on hierarchical models and holarchic relationships of cooperation and self-organization. As a product of natural selection, its organic mechanism cannot fix heritable variation and engineering is necessary to assemble and maintain efficiency and variability in order to make the organisms adaptable to environmental changes and capable of evolving. In this talk, I present the first whole-body prototype developed and designed with a team of world-leading technologists and scientists. I will cover how humans have ascended outside biology through wearable devices that transmit our thoughts and how prosthetics industry has become both a necessity and also a stylized accessory for those whose limbs have been replaced with narrow AI, haptic systems and which can be used to compete in the Olympics. Engineering the human body coalescences cells and code The extant force of exponential change on human nature is an anomaly for many. Understanding how our body is changing requires an understanding of the human journey. The sensibility that identifies every day human needs and social-political distinctions are surrounded by a shift in evolution. This is what it means to be human.  

The human being is a Homo sapiens and member of the extinct species of the genus Homo, whose ancestors are Homo erectus. We have been on this planet for 4.6 billion years in our continued evolution and more distinctly for the past 400,000 of evolution to becoming who we are today. Plainly put, we evolved from the Great Apes, who existed for approximately 20 million years. In this talk, I will address the next stages of our necessary evolution due in large part to the vulnerabilities of our biology. To survive we must evolve with the help of AI and nanomedicine, genetic engineering and other gene therapies that will ardently and aggressively tackle viruses that kill our family and friends

How credible are the sources informing us about existential risk, national security, climate change, global human rights, pandemics, and the aging population? This talk provides best practices in finding reliable, credible sources. We start simple by browsing scholarly databases, cross-referencing journalistic reporting, and identifying mind trusts for information such as science.gov, The World Factbook, UK Statistics and Encyclopedia Britannica, Oxford Academic and Cornell University. When unsure, the CRAAP text is applied (Currency, Relevance, Authority, Accuracy and Purpose). Slanting credible information are hyperbole and hysteria, such as with the physiological outbreak, due to questionable scientific reporting of nausea and seizures of 12,000 Japanese children. The culprit was a cartoon episode of Pokémon. Some believed the reaction was caused by the bright flashing lights of the animation. However, the Southern Medical Journal published a study refuted this claim. Consider the highly publicized study on autism, claiming that Mumps, Measles, and Rubella (MMR) vaccinations could cause autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children. When the study’s paper was published in the British medical journal The Lancet in 1998, it received considerable media attention. After a firestorm of controversy and public alarm, The Lancet revoked this study. There are a few poker tells that will help steer you away from their data, such as articles that are opinions or that do not cite their sources. The point being: disruptive ideas often result from technological innovations that afford new opportunities to uncover the unknown or disprove beliefs, which can result in harsh social or political reactions. There is a need for responsible (and honest) studies that can guide us in making choices about our personal and social choices  

Technology is doubling in magnitude and processing speed every 18 months, according to Moore’s Law. Exponential tech has become part of human existence, in our everyday experiences and in our abilities to communicate across the planet in nanoseconds. This talk covers why exponential tech is the future of how we think, not just the tools we use. Thinking strategies include linear, lateral, critical, creative and systems thinking and are inherent survival instincts for survival. Now, we have to relearn how to think exponentially. Because Quantum Computing is moving beyond the recognized the computer chip, the magnitude and speed will be far more advanced. Our thinking needs to be far more advanced as well. Exponential thinking is not just a cognitive process that requires rapid skills acquisition (RSA), it requires a future-oriented mindset. The strategies we employ today in our daily lives will impact what is to come.  

The quest for wisdom inspired cultural history and motivated by deep compassion for humanity. The talk addresses the fundamental nature of knowledge that seeded the arts and furthered scientific discovery. Humanism sough to develop a secular worldview with a non-scientific approach that diminished scientific advances and formed percepts based on “man remaining man”. Digital Humanism more recently attempted to form a digital cultural currency but lacked a theory. Between the robust and persuasive pillar of Humanism and the soft shaft of digital humanism, the philosophy of transhumanism have made the greatest global advances in unveiling human evolution and the potential and the perils of accelerating technologies and shifts brought about by AI, nanotechnology, genetic engineering, and automation. However, it is obfuscated by political polarizations that dampened the message

Bio note

Dr. Natasha Vita-More is a rare talent with a wide-range of skills across fields of design, science, and technology. She has appeared in more than two dozen televised documentaries, authored numerous articles and books about the future of humanity, achieved a scientific breakthrough, innovated the seminal whole-body prosthetic, and co-founded a global cultural movement. She is called “An early adapter of revolutionary changes” (Wired, 2000) and “Advocates the ethical use of technology to expand human capacities” (Politico, 2017). Ray Kurzweil states, “Natasha Vita-More is a very engaging, highly regarded, and dramatic speaker, writer, and thinker”. Natasha focuses on the ethical use of technology and evidence-based science for addressing the questions and concerns humanity faces. These include mitigating aging, healthy longevity, AI-human interfaces, robotics, nanotechnology and information tech. Her experience in the field of foresight studies establishes principles and practices for assessing humanity’s potential futures. Her proficiency as a professor of ethics has produced high-level scholarship toward understanding the challenges societies face. Known for being the co-founder of the transhumanist movement, introducing the seminal field of human enhancement for longevity in academics, developing the theory of the regenerative generation, Natasha continues to speak and write about cultural, philosophical, and socio-political issues concerning what it means to be human, and the need for lifelong learning to better understand the current environment and our place in it and to develop trajectories for where we are headed in the near and distant future.

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